Event: Filmmaker Rodrigo García

A READING BY RODRIGO GARCÍA

Kelly Writers House Fellows Program

April 22, 2013. 6:30 PM in the Arts Cafe

rsvp: seating strictly limited; please rsvp to whfellow@writing.upenn.edu or call 215-573-9749

Funded by a grant from Paul Kelly, the Kelly Writers House Fellows program enables us to realize two unusual goals. We want to make it possible for the youngest writers and writer-critics to have sustained contact with authors of great accomplishment in an informal atmosphere. We also want to resist the time-honored distinction — more honored in practice than in theory — between working with eminent writers on the one hand and studying literature on the other.

Rodrigo García was born in 1959 in Bogotá, Colombia, and was raised in Mexico. García, whom the Washington Post referred to affectionately as “the man who loves women” in a 2010 profile, is a director and writer for both TV and film, celebrated for his intimate, emotional and invested portrayals of his characters. He directed several independent movies which attracted critical acclaim, such as Things You Can Tell Just By Looking At Her (2000), Nine Lives (2005), and Albert Nobbs (2011). His greatest work to date has been the HBO series In Treatment, which ran from 2008 through the end of 2010, and which he created, wrote, and directed. García made fascinating use of the genre of the television series, where each season featured week-long stretches with one episode per night for five nights in a row, and then four in the third season, simulating the psychotherapist’s work week, each episode focusing on a session with a different patient.

While García’s father, writer Gabriel García Márquez, is best known for his works of magical realism, García has spent the better half of his career emphasizing the un-magical, and his style is an everyday realism. But such a style does not mean that touches of the mystical and the uncertain are absent from his work. There is a beautiful spirituality within both his directing and writing work. Contemporaneous with a TV era of American viewers who were obsessively watching, in real time, to find out whether or not 24’s Jack Bauer was going to explode into millions of pieces, García has used the concept of “real time” in TV to gain emotional depth and to connect with his audience, convincing them to care as much for the people he created as he genuinely did. As he quotes to the Washington Post, “Anybody can blow up cars. A director who can really get into the mysteries and complexity of women is very special.”

Advertisements